The eli4d Gazette – Issue 040

Tech Pick

I’ve mentioned the source control management system Git before as well as Jason McCreary’s excellent course. I recently came across some great information from Atlassian in regards to Git. Atlassian hosts a Github competitor called Bitbucket. One of Bitbucket’s great advantage is free hosting for unlimited private repositories.

Now onto the awesome tutorials from Atlassian:

Media Pick

It’s that time of the year, the leaves are turning gold and falling in some places, and Costco has Christmas decorations for sale. It’s also the time of the year for non-profit pledge drives like Radiotopia – a purveyor of independent, thoughtful, and occasionally heart wrenching podcasts. I am a big fan of “99% invisible”, “The truth”, and “Trump Con Law”.

Consider that only 7 in 10,000 listeners are actual supporters of Radiotopia (and I would guess similar podcasts).

Fun Pick

The iPhone X’s animoji capability is like Snapchat’s face filters on steroids. Here are some best animoji karaoke videos that I’ve come across (I know it’s ridiculous, but this cracks me up when I imagine the faces of the people that are producing this – contorting their faces and lip syncing to create the animoji facial expressions):


Thoughts? Feedback? Let me know: @eli4d on Twitter


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The eli4d Gazette – Issue 037

Tech Pick

I’ve been going through Jason McCreary‘s Getting Git course. I’ve used git superficially in the past, but I didn’t ‘get’ it. At $29 it is an amazing bargain and is well worth purchasing. The course is broken down into the following sections:

  • Making Changes
  • Viewing History
  • Managing Workflows
  • Sharing Work
  • Everyday Git

Each section contains the git commands related to that section, and it is covered through two videos. There’s an ‘init’ video which is a short video (typically one minute max) introducing the command. This is followed by a ‘Master’ video covering greater details of the command and providing context to both the section and its usage.

One core feature of this course is that it is all about the practical usage of git. There’s no esoteric ‘stuff,’ which is helpful when you need to work with git quickly.

My approach has been to mirror what Jason shows in a terminal window of my own and to take notes about it. Jason keeps each video’s set-up (in terms of the initial repository) to the bare minimum, which makes it fairly easy to follow and practice.

Media Pick

If you’re looking for a quirky podcast – check out Reply All. It’s hard to describe this podcast. I’d recommend that you start with the Phantom Caller episode.


Thoughts? Feedback? Let me know: @eli4d on Twitter


The eli4d Gazette – Issue 025


Issue 025: 2017-03-15

Tech Pick

Git is a version control system that most developers use. Additionally, most open source projects publish their source code repositories via Git (typically on GitHub). Consequently, it’s very useful to know Git. The funny part about Git is that initially, it’s easy to use, but any heavy usage can lead to a blackhole of frustration and concern (‘Am I doing this right or will I mess up my whole code base?’). I came across two great resources that you might find useful:

  • A very reasonably priced Git course called Getting Git. The developer (Jason McCreary) is pretty awesome and very giving regarding his knowledge and time. Here are two podcast episodes where Jason is interviewed (in case you want to know more about him):
  • If you’ve been interested in contributing to open source software but haven’t been sure how to do it, then you’ll find Matt Stauffer’s article to be very useful actionable.

Media Pick

I’m a sucker for Audible’s Daily Deal. This means I sometimes buy some audio books which are not in my wheel house (a good thing in terms of stepping out of my typical media consumption). I just finished a daily deal purchase – “Radical Acceptance” by Tara Brach. It was a stunningly good book about the actual implementation and use of Buddhism in daily life. The reader (Cassandra Campbell) was excellent, and I plan to re-listen to it at a future point with the intent of practice rather than just consumption.

Note: While this is not directly related – through my various audio book purchases I learned the following lesson: Never ever ever buy an audio book that is read by the author. 9 out of 10 times such a book ends up being a terrible disappointment. One such example is “Algorithms to Live By”. I have yet to be able to get through the book because of the author’s reading. It’s great content but terrible delivery.


Thoughts? Feedback? Let me know: @eli4d on Twitter