How to Reset a Mac OS X Application (ScreenFlow in this case)

Overview

This article covers how to do an application reset on ScreenFlow 5 on Mac OS X – Yosemite. It’s more of a reminder to myself but I’m documenting this in case it might help someone else.

The usual disclaimer applies here – I’m not responsible for any potential destruction that may occur on your machine if you follow any of this information.

It started with constant crashes of ScreenFlow 5.0.6

I’ve been working on creating videos for the online version of my Stanford Continuing Studies JavaScript class. I’ve been using ScreenFlow for quite a while because it’s awesome (i.e. intuitive and easy to use), or better said – it was awesome up to now 😦 .

So what happened? The long and short of it was that whenever I tried to smooth volume levels by checking the “Smooth Volume Levels” checkbox, the application would crash. Every stinking time – ScreenFlow 5.0.6 crashed.

It started with constant crashes of ScreenFlow 5

ScreenFlow’s fantastic crashing sequence

First I would get the problem report screen and I would click “Reopen”

First I would get the problem report screen and I would click "Reopen"

Then when ScreenFlow started up again I would get a Crash Reporter screen

I’ve seen this crash reporter screen over and over and over again. I’ve included my email with the report but I’ve heard nothing from Telestream. At this point, I’ve reached the conclusion that it’s an automated report that might go to Telestream but then again it might not (as in /dev/null on Telestream’s side).

Then when ScreenFlow started up again I would get a Crash Reporter screen

How The Omni Group deals with crashes

As a comparison of an app/company that approaches this correctly, when OmniFocus crashes (whether on Mac OS X or iOS) it generates a crash report that it sends via email. The Omni Group’s ticketing system responds with a ticket number and an explanation that this crash has been recorded in their system. As a user I feel that someone (perhaps Ken Case in cat form) will see this ticket via such an acknowledgment.

Image credit: https://imgflip.com/i/11b9de

How The Omni Group deals with crashes

I pointlessly attempt to submit a ticket to Telestream asking for crash resolution and a a download of an earlier version of ScreenFlow

I attempted to submit a ticket to Telestream through my registered user account but this didn’t work. Then I vented my frustration through Twitter (yes – I know – not constructive…though the crash logs are constructive – aren’t they…come on Telestream?).

I also ran ScreenFlow 5.0.2 and the same crash occurs over and over again. So a useful data point – it’s not the latest version that is problematic.

I pointlessly attempt to submit a ticket to Telestream asking for crash resolution and a a download of an earlier version of ScreenFlow

It’s time to work the problem

Maybe it’s my environment. Maybe it’s a recent Yosemite security update. Maybe it’s a solar flare. There are too many things that might have changed since the time when ScreenFlow was stable. So while I can’t track all the environmental/system changes from that point, I can at least clean up any plists, cache, and crash files related to ScreenFlow (this is the duct tape approach).

Image credit: https://barefootmeds.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/duct-tape-quote-from-the-martian-by-andy-weir.jpg

It's time to work the problem

How do I find all the setting/cache files related to ScreenFlow

I have a copy of CleanMyMac 2 and I run it to see what I get under the “uninstaller” option. When I click on the “Application Reset” button, CleanMyMac helpfully puts filled out checkboxes next to all settings/cache/crash files that are related to ScreenFlow but are not part of the ScreenFlow program. There’s a big “Reset” button at the bottom of CleanMyMac and I use it to delete all of these files.

How do I find all the setting/cache files related to ScreenFlow

I re-run ScreenFlow after the above “application reset”

OMG – smoothing volume levels works without a ScreenFlow crash…for a couple of videos.

I re-run ScreenFlow after the above "application reset"

After editing a few videos – the crashes recur

So this is an electronic duct tape solution but it works for now.

Image credit: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/3f/36/7e/3f367e93c1dff96b17444d027a3989c6.jpg

After editing a few videos - the crashes recur

A teeny tiny problem with CleanMyMac 2

One problem with CleanMyMac is after deleting these files – CleanMyMac doesn’t refresh all of the ScreenFlow associated files so to see this again (so I can re-delete them) – I need to quit CleanMyMac and do it again whenever ScreenFlow begins to crash.

It would be great to script this up so I can run it as a bash alias. Luckily, CleanMyMac provides a very helpful way to find out the location of the specific folders/files.

A teeny tiny problem with CleanMyMac 2

The best-est bash alias ever

Ok – so it’s not the best because ScreenFlow values are hardcoded and bash is the shell equivalent of the Punisher (at times). But it’s good enough for now.

The best-est bash alias ever

Conclusion

Looking for instructions on Mac OS X app resets on duckduckgo and google doesn’t yield many useful results. CleanMyMac 2 is pretty good about showing application files that relate to cache, crash, and plists. Using these as a guideline it is fairly easy to create a bash alias to bring out a somewhat big duct-taped club for ScreenFlow’s settings and to deal with a recurring crash.

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Time Machine Slowdown Issue and Resolution

Problem:

Right after coming back from the holidays I noticed that my machine was completely unusable when Time Machine (TM) would run (on Yosemite). It was so bad that I would need to pull the external USB hard disk without ejecting any partitions (while cringing inside) to be able to get control of my machine.

My system’s specs: mid 2014 MacBook Pro 15″ with a 2.5 GHz i7 CPU running Yosemite.

Solution:

This solution worked for me but the usual disclaimers apply.

Initially, I ran TM overnight thinking it had to catch up on some holiday weeks that it missed in terms of backups. This assumption was wrong. When I looked at the 1 TB partition that I had made available for TM it had only 25 GB left. It seemed like TM was thrashing my whole machine in attempting to clean up old backups.

The next thing I did was to shut TM off so that I could use my system while figuring how to delete old backups off the TM partition. I first tried to delete individual backups and I found this Stack Exchange article to be extremely useful: http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/39287/how-can-i-manually-delete-old-backups-to-free-space-for-time-machine.

I tried both the command line approach of deleting specific TM backups and I also used the TM interface. The biggest problem was that I couldn’t tell which backups were extremely large (running ‘du’ on the directories was useless due to permission issues and a long response time). Additionally, when I used the TM interface, it would block me from using my system for anything besides Time Machine (command line was much better). I then decided to delete all the backups using command line and I got tons of error -36 messages. So this didn’t work well.

My solution was the nuclear option – i.e. nuke the TM partition and start over:

  1. Shut off TM via system preference
  2. Disconnect TM partition via Finder
  3. Use Disk Utility to erase partition:
    • name it with current year so it’s different name than original
    • it will complain giving an error while it removes the encrypted partition that TM created
    • re-erase partition after the initial error so actual erasure occurs
  4. In TM system preference:
    • remove the old disk (you can’t do this until the partition is gone)
    • create new TM disk by selecting the new TM partition

This is probably old hat to experienced users of the Mac but it was new to me.

If you found this useful – let me know via @eli4d on Twitter